(2019 Summer Series, Blog #2)

At 7:30 p.m. one recent evening, Rob and I were alerted via the Life360 tracking app that Matt had left First Place and was traveling down Third Street toward Central Avenue. We knew the First Place van had taken Matt and other residents out for a weekly Tasty Tuesday excursion but had also returned everyone to the property. So, what compelled Matt to take a hike? He never leaves the property alone.

Alarmed to say the least, we proceeded to check out all the systems we have in place. First, Matt’s in-home camera didn’t show any activity. Second, we saw he had not yet checked off the next item on his iPad schedule or contacted me for our nightly FaceTime visit—both of which are listed on his list of daily to-do’s.

What to do next? We switched to a simple phone call to First Place inquiring why Matt had left the property and where he was going. With great relief, we learned from the concierge that Matt was safe and sound in his apartment—but without his iPad. He had left his backpack in the First Place van after the group dinner out at a local restaurant. In his trusty backpack were his iPad and iPhone, both with the Life360 tracking app.

Staff recognized immediately that his backpack was missing because it wasn’t hanging in the usual low-tech “drop and go” spot, an area where residents can routinely charge their electronics and store their keys and other belongings for quick drop-off/retrieval. Whew! What a great test of our systems; we passed with flying colors—this time!

Matt often accesses other items in his personal technology portfolio—namely Alexa on his Echo (high-tech) to bring The Beatles, Elton John and The Beach Boys into his home, update his grocery list and check the weather. Based on the forecast, he consults his laminated “What do I wear?” chart (low-tech!) before laying out his clothes for the next day. Another app allows Matt to recognize who’s at the door and respond to a ring accordingly (after ignoring our knocks and inadvertently leaving us stranded outside his apartment). And he depends on a Sharpie ink mark to tell his right shoe from his left.

Matt still deals with breakthrough seizures despite medication, so keeping a watchful eye on him and making sure he’s safe is priority number one. Nearly all his furniture is soft, and area rugs absorb sound and offer cushioning. A variety of high- and low-tech systems is essential as we strive to balance his personal privacy and independence with safety concerns.

We remain focused on Matt’s many strengths, as well as the caring and capable community empowering him to live more independently as he enjoys more life experiences and benefits from support specialists, community life, technology, family members and neighbors, all of which play a crucial role in his daily life—and ours!

Next up, Blog #3: Gradually Building on Success: Taking stock of the little stuff, too

(2019 Summer Series, Blog #1)

Matt is a 28-year-old man with “classic” autism who has been able to work, communicate with some limitations and enjoy a good game of Uno or Scrabble. We take stock in these and other strengths, including his ability to make most of his meals (in part due to his self-limited menu). And yet, while he’s learned how to peel and cut apple slices (one of two fruits he’ll eat), he’s not able to tell a good apple from a rotten one.

So here’s what Matt can do:

In a relatively short time, Matt has learned the value of his apartment key and what to do if he forgets or loses it, the joys of Face Timing with mom and dad, and the creature comforts of his new digs.

And then there’s what he can’t do:

More about Matt is documented in the First Place Interest Survey, reminding us of his interests and those we’d like him to explore, and his Personal Profile, acknowledging areas where he can be independent, needs some support or is totally dependent.

We’re still working on more accurate responses to Matt’s confounding “wh…” questions, thanks to weekly parent training sessions and monthly staff meetings, including those with clinicians from the Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center (SARRC).

But learning to live independently didn’t start here. It started with dedicated First Place staff to build a week in his life, day by day, figuring out how it would all come together. Matt started with just a few pieces of furniture and a few overnights a week at First Place with me sleeping on the couch—listening, lying awake, scribbling notes about Matt’s many needs (OK, and fretting some, too…).

We’ve started this journey grateful that we’re by his side—and that First Place and SARRC are by ours, keeping us all on the right path and feeling more confident in our futures.

Next up, Small Steps and a Big Team: The benefits of high- and low-tech solutions (Summer 2019 Series, Blog #2)

Our 2019 summer blog series chronicles the journey of our son Matt’s transition to life at First Place–Phoenix, thanks in large part to Rob—Matt’s tech-savvy dad, “father of fun” and my husband of 35 years—our supportive family and the talented First Place team. We hope it will assist you or those you love through some valuable lessons learned along the way.

While Matt has been our personal inspiration, we’ve reached out far and wide over the past two decades to inform the design and operations of First Place–Phoenix through the evaluation of 100 properties for special populations across the U.S. We’ve hosted focus groups, national design charrettes and a national family roundtable, acknowledging hopes, dreams and fears.

Much time has also been invested in community life at First Place, with a focus on how residents connect with the broader community where people make friends, find jobs, access healthcare, enjoy lifelong learning—and have fun!

We recognize the huge transition this represents for us as parents seeking to build confidence in the future: Matt’s and ours. Every planning session, every hard hat tour and now every day in real time remind us of Matt’s momentous, complex and profound journey.

We hope you’ll join us on this summer blog series—and benefit from some of the valuable, enduring lessons we’ve learned along the way!

Next: Plugging the Holes: Taking note of what Matt can—and can’t—do (Summer Series Blog #1)